The Hospital: Life, Death, and Dollars in a Small American Town

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From the C suite's tension filled strategic planning meetings to life or death moments at the bedside, Alexander nimbly and grippingly translates the byzantine world of American health care into a real life narrative with people you come to care about.
New York Times


Takes readers into the world of the American medical industry in a way no book has done before.details how we've created the dilemma we're in.
Fortune

With his signature gut punching prose, Alexander breaks our hearts as he opens our eyes to America's deep rooted sickness and despair by imme.

Rsing us in the lives of a small town hospital and the people it serves. Beth Macy, bestselling author of Dopesick

By following the struggle for survival of one small town hospital, and the patients who walk, or are carried, through its doors,The Hospital takes readers into the world of the American medical industry in a way no book has done before. Americans are dying sooner, and living in poorer health. Alexander argues that no plan will solve America's health crisis until the deeper causes of that crisis are addressed.

Bryan, Ohio's hospital, is losing money, making it vulnerable to big health systems seeking domination and Phil Ennen, CEO, has been fighting to preserve its independence. Me.

The Hospital: Life Death and Dollars in a Small American TownRsing us in the lives of a small town hospital and the people it serves. Beth Macy, bestselling author of Dopesick

By following the struggle for survival of one small town hospital, and the patients who walk, or are carried, through its doors,The Hospital takes readers into the world of the American medical industry in a way no book has done before. Americans are dying sooner, and living in poorer health. Alexander argues that no plan will solve America's health crisis until the deeper causes of that crisis are addressed.

Bryan, Ohio's hospital, is losing money, making it vulnerable to big health systems seeking domination and Phil Ennen, CEO, has been fighting to preserve its independence. Me.