The Myth of Artificial Intelligence: Why Computers Can't Think the Way We Do

The Myth of Artificial IntelligenceIf you want to know about AI, read this bookit shows how a supposedly futuristic reverence for Artificial Intelligence retards progress when it denigrates our most irreplaceable resource for any future progress: our own human intelligence. Peter Thiel



A cutting edge AI researcher and tech entrepreneur debunks the fantasy that superintelligence is just a few clicks away and argues that this myth is not just wrong, it's actively blocking innovation and distorting our ability to make the crucial next leap.

Futurists insist that AI will soon eclipse the capacities of the most gifted human mind. What hope do we have against superintellige.

Nt machines? But we aren't really on the path to developing intelligent machines. In fact, we don't even know where that path might be.

A tech entrepreneur and pioneering research scientist working at the forefront of natural language processing, Erik Larson takes us on a tour of the landscape of AI to show how far we are from superintelligence, and what it would take to get there. Ever since Alan Turing, AI enthusiasts have equated artificial intelligence with human intelligence. This is a profound mistake. AI works on inductive reasoning, crunching data sets to predict outcomes. But humans don't correlate data sets: we make conjectures informed b.

The Myth of Artificial Intelligence: Why Computers Can't Think the Way We DoNt machines? But we aren't really on the path to developing intelligent machines. In fact, we don't even know where that path might be.

A tech entrepreneur and pioneering research scientist working at the forefront of natural language processing, Erik Larson takes us on a tour of the landscape of AI to show how far we are from superintelligence, and what it would take to get there. Ever since Alan Turing, AI enthusiasts have equated artificial intelligence with human intelligence. This is a profound mistake. AI works on inductive reasoning, crunching data sets to predict outcomes. But humans don't correlate data sets: we make conjectures informed b.

Genius Makers: The Mavericks Who Brought AI to Google, Facebook, and the World

Ial discourse, and our daily lives, with few of us even noticing.

Long dismissed as a technology of the distant future, artificial intelligence was a project consigned to the fringes of the scientific community. Then two researchers changed everything. One was a sixty four year old computer science professor who didn't drive and didn't fly because he could no longer sit down but still made his way across North America for the moment that would define a new age of technology. The other was a thirty six year old neuroscientist and chess prodigy who laid claim to being the greatest game player of all time before vowing to build a machine that could do anything the human brain could do.

They took two very different paths to that lofty goal, and they disagreed on how quickly it would arri.

Genius Makers: The Mavericks Who Brought AI to Google, Facebook, and the World

Genius MakersThis colorful page turner puts artificial intelligence into a human perspective. Through the lives of Geoff Hinton and other major players, Metz explains this transformative technology and makes the quest thrilling. Walter Isaacson, author of The Code Breaker



Recipient of starred reviews in both Kirkus and Library JournalTHE UNTOLD TECH STORY OF OUR TIME

What does it mean to be smart? To be human? What do we really want from life and the intelligence we have, or might create?

With deep and exclusive reporting, across hundreds of interviews, New York Times Silicon Valley journalist Cade Metz brings you into the rooms where these questions are being answered. Where an extraordinarily powerful new artificial intelligence has been built into our biggest companies, our soc.

Genius Makers: The Mavericks Who Brought AI to Google Facebook and the WorldIal discourse, and our daily lives, with few of us even noticing.

Long dismissed as a technology of the distant future, artificial intelligence was a project consigned to the fringes of the scientific community. Then two researchers changed everything. One was a sixty four year old computer science professor who didn't drive and didn't fly because he could no longer sit down but still made his way across North America for the moment that would define a new age of technology. The other was a thirty six year old neuroscientist and chess prodigy who laid claim to being the greatest game player of all time before vowing to build a machine that could do anything the human brain could do.

They took two very different paths to that lofty goal, and they disagreed on how quickly it would arri.